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fall 2013
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Artisans Guild Art Studio

art student | art studio art students | art studio art instructor | art studio

The Artisans Guild Art Studio opened in 2003 to share the experience, experiments, and art theories for beginners to advanced students. The studio continues to flourish with the inspirations of family, friends, artists and students. The studio has become a source of enjoyment for many students in the Stevens Point Wisconsin area.

For those who are new to the studio, let me tell you a little bit about it. I offer instruction in various mediums with the primary focus on watercolor, mixed media, and alternative art techniques.

Art A.G.A.S. offers classes for a specific subjects, or allows you to use your own subject, focusing on color, applications, new techniques, to create your own signature piece of work. We offer classes that are three hours long as well as weekend (one day) workshops. We also offer select open studio hours which allows you working time to come into the studio and work on
your projects with direction from an art instructor to help you complete your projects. The studio welcomes individual private classes and private group classes. We also work with kids art projects tailored to their age group.

Visit us soon for the upcoming 2013 Fall/Winter Class Catalogue

Jeanne Chase Biography

Fine Artist | Jeanne Chase | Artisans Guild Art Studio

 

She is known for her watercolors, and routinely brings in other artists for other mediums to ensure many aspects of watercolor are entertained as well as entertaining to both her students and herself. She is a member of the Wisconsin Valley Art Association and active in various local art programs. She is also an active supporter and participant in local fund raisers such as ARTS NIGHT (benefiting the Woman's Fund of Portage County), ARTS BASH (benefiting the arts program at the University of Wisconsin - Steven Point) and the Riverfront Arts Gift Show (benefiting the Riverfront Arts Center).

Jeanne Chase's harmonious paintings embrace the reflective nature of watercolor. Her unique style has been exhibited in many galleries and shows throughout the Midwest. A Watercolorist, for over 30 years, she has also given instruction to other artists enthusiastic to develop their own personal technique. Her paintings are sought by the collector and other artists.

Jeanne Chase supports artists, artist critiques, art exhibitions, art shows and art galleries as well as offers studio art classes as the instructor. Jeanne is a graduate of the University Wisconsin where she majored in Interior Design and minor in Architecture. While living in Texas, she took her interest in art more seriously and studied under several watercolor artists, such as Jane Jones. After moving back to Stevens Point, Wisconsin in 1993 she began painting with local artists. Like many artists, she's helpful to others who take an interest, and she started teaching beginner level classes at a local studio in 1995. As she became more accomplished and well known, and sought for her enthusiasm for art as well as artists, she opened her own studio in 2003 where she now teaches classes and workshops at all levels.

Jeanne Chase is a graduate of the University Wisconsin where she majored in Interior Design and minored in Architecture. While living in Texas, she took her interest in art more seriously and studied under several watercolor artists, such as Jane Jones. After moving back to Stevens Point, Wisconsin in 1993 she began painting with local artists. Like many artists, she's helpful to others who take an interest, and she started teaching beginner level classes at a local studio in 1995.

As she became more accomplished and well known, and sought for her enthusiasm for art as well as artists, she opened her own studio in 2003 where she now teaches classes and workshops at all levels. She is known for her watercolors, and routinely brings in other artists for other mediums to ensure many aspects of watercolor are entertained as well as entertaining to both her students and herself.

She is a member of the Wisconsin Valley Art Association and active in various local art programs. She is also an active supporter and participant in local fund raisers such as ARTS NIGHT (benefiting the Woman's Fund of Portage County), ARTS BASH (benefiting the arts program at the University of Wisconsin - Steven Point) and the Riverfront Arts Gift Show (benefiting the Riverfront Arts Center).

Jeanne’s work reflects her enthusiasm for art. She is the torch bearer for art lovers. When she’s moving around, she brings the flame to others. At rest, others are drawn to the light. In short, she’s a supporter of the arts whether she’s teaching a beginner, working alongside the accomplished or helping raise funds. She loves sharing her love for art with others who feel or may be discovering the same.

 

Studio Techniques

We also conduct your own transparency, staining and sediment tests to determine the outcome of paints directly applied or mixed with complements to achieve the outcome of a watercolor painting. Finally, each layer of color is dried thoroughly before glazing the next layer over it. This gives the best chance of not lifting the underlying color using the watercolor medium.

Watercolor Pouring

Preparation The chosen watercolor paper is the favorite paper, Arches 140lb cold press. The sheet is soaked in room temperature water for about ten to fifteen minutes, draining off the excess water, and placing it on a basswood board (or Gator board). To stretch the paper, start by placing four staples close together in the center along one edge of the sheet. Place the staples a half inch from the edge. Turn the board to the opposite side and pull the paper gently but firmly directly across from the first four staples. Hold the stretched paper in place and staple four more times on this side, again a half inch in and close together. Now repeat with the remaining two sides. Pull each corner out as far as possible, hold and staple. Finish by stapling every two inches all the way around the paper's edge. Allow the sheet to dry completely. Tape over the staples and over the paper's edge and onto the board with two-inch masking tape. This will prevents glazes from creeping under the paper's edge that could cause a backwash or bloom effect is in the glaze.

Pouring a Glaze Decide on a color palette for your painting. Mix each color intended to pour in a separate mixing cup. Wetting the area to be glazed or using a spray bottle for this wherever possible to support the next poured layers. The glaze will flow only where the paper is wet. It stops when the paper is dry, so paint is only poured in the wet area(s). Using a soft brush and very gently fill in the specified area with water to create a hard edge, if necessary. Using a pump sprayer whenever possible to wet the prepared paper creates different shapes and effects. It will cause no harm to the paper's surface.

Oil Pastels

Oil Pastels Pastel paintings are very durable, permanent. Pastels do not yellow and the color does not oxidize, change, or fade with age. The texture of the working surface for a pastel painting provides the tooth needed for the pastel to adhere. Surfaces for pastel paintings can be textured paper or stiff card, sandpaper, pastel cloth, or even canvas. The more textural the working surface, the more layers of pastel may be overlaid to create a painting of depth and intensity. Depending on the texture and color of the surface, the pastel artist creates a different mood or feeling for the finished painting. Dry and solid, pastels are blended on the working surface rather than on a separate palette like the wet mediums of oil, acrylic, or watercolor. Blending pastel colors on the surface can take many forms. Finger, brush, or cloth blending can create a smooth uninterrupted surface. Crosshatching or laying down adjacent open strokes or dots of different colors allows the eye to optically blend colors. The application of pastels can also use water or turpentine to achieve different effects. This versatility, in and of itself, as well as the ability to combine pastel with other mediums, adds to the endless adaptations an artist can explore when using pastels. See Varnish under Oil Painting for the finished product for oil pastels.

Oil Painting

Oil Painting Preparing the canvas An oil painting begins with a base or support that consists of canvas stretched upon a frame. To prepare a canvas, first stretch it on a wooden frame and tack the canvas to the frame. Paint smooth layer of gesso to seal the canvas. Colors: The colors are made by dispersing pigments in linseed or sunflower oil. Unlike watercolors or acrylics, they are slow-drying. Canvas: Use can of gesso and paint is onto the canvas or paint surface (including pre-primed & stretched canvas from the art store). Slightly dilute the gesso with water. Other options: Wood, glass, masonite, hard papers serve as alternative surfaces for illustration boards or canvases. Paints: Titanium White, Payne's Gray, Cadmium Red, Alizarin Crimson, Cadmium Yellow, Ultramarine Blue. Brushes: Good brushes are expensive, but, will last far longer and don't lose any hair in the painting. Thinners: They thin the oil color by diluting the linseed oil. Turpentine is the traditional solvent, with a characteristic smell, and the other, more expensive option is Turpenoid that is odorless, yet potent. Knives: The use of palette knives can be used them for both applying the paint in strokes or flat slabs - that adds physical texture to the surface of a painting. Sketching and underpainting: Transfer your sketch to the board (there are different ways to do that - tracing paper, carbon paper, actual sketching freehand, etc. Painting: Paint can be taken straight from the tube and layer on to the painting for impasto (slightly three-dimensional) effects, or work with a dry brush for texture, or "scratch out" with a sharp tool. Varnishing-matt or gloss: Use it on completed paintings to protect them from time and damage.

Photography

Canon D10 Camera is the source of the photographs represented in this portfolio. The images are defined by the use lighting, filtering (52mm), composition, and visual concepts. Adobe Photoshop is used to edit the digital images and transform their artist representations as the Art of Life surrounding the artist. Prints are derived from multiple options in the digital age─canvas, watercolor paper, iris giclee, premium finishes for portraits, still life, post cards, calendars, etc. Many images represented within this portfolio have been solicitations from the Delafield business owners and Chamber of Commerce in the form of post cards, souveniors, and images that represent the sense of community as shown within the portfolio. Artist Biography sheets are also enclosed within Calliope Artisans portfolio. The biographies are available upon request.